Best of 2016: My Personal Favourites in Berlin

My 40th blog post for Central Berlin and my last blog post in 2016. Time for some reminiscence. Not only because it has been a strange and at the same time awesome year, but also because I definitely don’t want to think about the fact that 2017 will have me turning 30. It feels like all of 2016 was spent eating, drinking, shopping and discovering new things – neighbourhoods, culinary highlights, you name it. Below are my 2016 highlights.

Katie's Blue Cat
Katie’s Blue Cat. Image courtesy of Moritz Nicolaus Schmid/teNeues Digital Media

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West German and East German: A Country Divided by One Language

Bavarian, Swabian, Hessian, Saxon… There are plenty of regional dialects in Germany. The four decades during which Germany was divided into the German Democratic Republic (GDR) and the Federal Republic of Germany have also left their mark on the development of the German language. Although they have always shared the same written language, East Germans and West Germans, aka “Ossis” and “Wessis”, often find it difficult to talk to each other. Read on to learn more about the key linguistic differences between both parts of the country.

sprachunterschiede-englische-version

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Time Travel in Berlin: Back to the 20s, 50s and 70s

How great would it be to make short trips to the past? It doesn’t have to be too far back: spend a weekend dancing in the 20s, go shopping in the 50s and watch a band play in the 60s… Let me tell you a little secret: you don’t need a time machine for that! In a city like Berlin, history is everywhere – not just the buildings, but also the opportunity to actually experience it. Here’s where you can be a part of modern history…

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The Golden Twenties in Berlin. Image courtesy of madamepickwickartblog.com

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10 GDR Christmas Traditions

Christmas celebrates the birth of Jesus Christ.
This was no different in socialist East Germany – except that the GDR’s political leadership had no truck with religion.
Christianity did not fit in well with their atheist ideology.

None of this stopped East Germans from celebrating the feast of love, peace and generosity – albeit not quite in the way we’re used to today.

Below are 10 traditions associated with Christmas in the GDR.
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